Month: August 2017

Belair Club Ride

It was a hot and dusty ride in on the Whistle Pig trail, bandannas and goggles were needed to say the least. We had eighteen machine start out with one failure on the rail bed. We had to unfortunately leave one machine in Power-View for pick up. We headed back in the dust and made it back to the trailer by 5:30. It was a test of man machine as the heat was causing a few machines to over heat on the way home. It was great to see the new Belair trail system and look forward in seeing the improvements in the future. Thank you to Gary for leading and showing us the new trail system in the Belair forest.

AOHVA Approaching Land Use Changes with Determination

As we all know, ORV riding has become a significant leisure time activity for families across Canada. In Manitoba alone, the ORV industry is estimated to generate over $250 million per year. Enjoying the outdoors on an ORV has always required access to public lands. Across the country, vast trail systems have been developed, and in Manitoba our member clubs have been working hard in conjunction with ATVMB, the provincial government and various stakeholders – with to date limited funds – to create new trails in Manitoba, which is growing each year as new opportunities become available. Managed trails have proven to provide safety for riders while reducing environmental impact, thus it is essential that public land remain acessible for all Manitobans to enjoy.

It is with a measure of disapointment we continue to hear about the continued targeting of ORV users in Alberta by Alberta’s provincial NDP government, who appear to be attempting to enact one of the largest land use changes in the province’s history. Part of the focus is on the Castle region, which encompasses an area of over 103,000 hectares which is banned to ORV users. Alberta’s Environment Minister Shannon Phillips even went so far as to indicate those those who oppose the ban are “the radical far right” in an article in the Calgary Herald on July 27th:¬†http://calgaryherald.com/news/local-news/province-announces-184-new-campsites-as-part-of-castle-parks-upgrade.

ATVMB strongly opposes the Minister’s identity politics. ORV riding is not a political issue, it is a recognized, long-standing form of recreation that is enjoyed by people from all walks of life. From nurses to teachers to farmers and more, ORV riding is enjoyed by Canadians and their families on a daily basis. Below is a link to the newsletter from AOHVA decribing the ongoing efforts of the tens of thousands of ORV riders in Alberta who respect and want to continue to maintain a comprehensive trail management strategy to ensure public land remains open to all user groups.

Thank You to All the Volunteers

We would like to thank all the volunteers that spend their free time this past weekend work on the Eastman trail system.

We have expanded our trail system and we have build up one section of trail and have cleared another part of the expansion of our trail system. We had three crews working. one cleaning and cutting fallen trees along the trail system.

Our second crew was building up the new section of the trail and repair section of the exciting trail system

The third crew was cleaning culverts and remove material from the drainage system along the trail.

ELEVATED WILDFRIE DANGER

Manitoba Sustainable Development and the Office of the Fire Commissioner advise hot and dry conditions have elevated the wildfire danger levels in many areas of the province heading into the August long weekend.

Manitobans are reminded to exercise extreme caution with any outdoor activities. In areas where ATV use is authorized, stay on developed trails, stop frequently to check areas around the engine and exhaust for debris and carefully dispose of any debris found. Riders should carry a small shovel, axe and fire extinguisher at all times.

No open burning is allowed without a permit between April 1 and Nov. 15. For information on permits and restrictions, Manitobans can contact their local Sustainable Development office. Municipalities often implement their own restrictions, so individuals should also check with local municipal offices for further information.

Anyone planning a backcountry trip is reminded campfires should only be made in designated fire pits, however a better option is to prepare meals on a light weight portable cook stove. Campers heading into a remote area should tell someone else where they are going and when they expect to return, checking in upon return or if plans change.

To report a wildfire, contact local emergency services at 911 or the forest fire tip line at 1-800-782-0076 (toll-free). More information on wildfire prevention is available at www.gov.mb.ca/wildfire/.

Scroll to top